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Family Resources

Support your student during COVID-19 closures.
 
Keep a routine
 
Since changes in routine can be stressful, it will be helpful to talk with your kids about why they are staying home and what your daily structure will be during this time. Let them help create a daily schedule that can hang on the refrigerator or somewhere they can see it each day. Be sure to include breaks from telework or schoolwork to relax and connect with each other.
 
Here are some ideas to help you create a daily schedule:
 
  • Wake up, get dressed, and have breakfast at a normal time.
  • Decide where everyone can do their work most effectively and without distractions.
  • List the times for learning, exercise, and breaks.
    • For younger children, 20 minutes of class assignments followed by 10 minutes of physical activity might work well.
    • Older children and teens may be able to focus on assignments for longer stretches, taking breaks between subjects.
    • Include your hours as well, so your children know when the workday is done.
  • Schedule time for nutritious lunches and snacks. Many schools are providing take-home school meal packages for students who need them.
  • Don't forget afternoon breaks as well!
  • Have dinner together as a family and discuss the day.
  • Enjoy more family time in the evenings, playing, reading, watching a movie, or exercising together.
  • Stick with normal bedtime routines as much as possible during the week to make sure everyone gets enough sleep.
 
Try not to have the news on all day. It is best not to have the news on while kids are in the room as it can increase their fear and anxiety (and yours!). If they do listen to the news, talk together about what they are hearing and correct any misinformation or rumors you may hear.
 
Should I worry about extra screen time right now?
 
While limits are still important, it's understandable that under these stressful circumstances, kids' screen media use will likely increase. Here are some ways to help keep the media use positive and helpful:
 
  • Contact teachers about education online and offline activities your children should do. Preschool teachers may not have an online curriculum to share, but good options include PBS Kids, which is sending out a daily newsletter with show and activity ideas.
  • Use social media for good. Check-in with your neighbors, friends, and loved ones. If schools are closed, find out if there are ways to help students who need meals or internet access for at-home learning.
  • Use media for social connection. Social distancing can be isolating. If your kids are missing their school friends or other families, try video chats or social media to stay in touch.
  • Choose quality content and use trusted sources to find it. Common Sense Media, for example, suggests 25 dance games and other active apps, websites, and video games​ for families hunkering down right now.
  • Use the media together. This is a great opportunity to monitor what your older children are seeing online and follow what your children are learning. Even watching a family movie together can help everyone relax while you appreciate the storytelling and meaning that movies can bring.
  • Take your child (virtually) to work. Working from home? Use this time as a chance to show your kids a part of your world. Encouraging imaginative “work" play may be a way to apply “take your child to work day" without ever leaving home!
  • Limits are still important. As always, technology use should not push out the time needed for needed sleep, physical activity, reading, or family connection. Make a plan about how much time kids can play video games online with friends, and where their devices will charge at night.
 
Remember
 
Staying at home and other social distancing recommendations may feel like an inconvenience, but it's the best way right now to protect our family, friends, and neighbors who may be vulnerable.
 
If anyone in your home starts showing symptoms of COVID-19, call your doctor to discuss what to do.

El Dorado Charter SELPA

Special education is a complex and ever-changing system of principles, practices, relevant laws and policies. Understanding special education processes and working with your school can be complex. Whether you have a question about special education or need support in working with your school, we are here to help.